LEE STROBEL EL CASO DEL CREADOR PDF

El Caso del Creador. Un Periodista Investiga Evidencias Cientificas Que Apuntan Hacia Dios. by Lee Strobel (Author),. Share. El caso del creador: Un periodista investiga evidencias científicas que apuntan hacia Dios. (Spanish Edition) eBook: Lee Strobel: : Kindle Store. Buy El Caso del Creador: Un Periodista Investiga Evidencias Cientificas Que Apuntan God by Lee Strobel (ISBN: ) from Amazon’s Book Store.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Caao Currently Reading Read.

Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The Case for a Creator A journalist investigates scientific evidence that points toward God.

In recent years, a diverse and impressive body of research has increasingly supported the conclusion that the universe was intelligently designed. Join Strobel as he reexamines the theories that once led him away from God. Through his compelling and highly readable account, you’ll e The Case for a Creator A journalist investigates scientific evidence that points toward God. Through his compelling and highly readable account, you’ll encounter mind-stretching stfobel from cosmology, cellular biology, DNA research, astronomy, physics, and human consciousness that present astonishing evidence in The Case for a Creator.

Published October 7th by Vida first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about El Caso Del Csaoplease sign up. Go to the library. Does the author look at the case against Christ? Or only the arguments for Christ? Megan He came into the research with the intentions of disproving Christ so that he can convince his newly converted wife to drop her faith.

So, far from …more He came into the research with the intentions of disproving Christ so that he can convince his newly converted wife to drop her faith. So, far from going in for Christ, he went in to disprove Christ. See all 11 questions about El Caso Del Creador…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. This casso is not very well written both in terms of the writing itself and in being unconvincing. The author interviews several conservative scholars about many of the common challenges to the Bible and Christian theology and gets their responses.

The trouble is that the author tries to pretend he wtrobel this hard hitting journalist who doesn’t pull any punches and creacor his subjects with bull-dog like tenacity and Well the reality is that he is none of th This book is not very lef written both in terms of the writing itself and in being unconvincing.

Well the reality is that he is none of those things. Strobrl interview has the same pattern. Build the credibility of the subject both in the professional and personal sense “I ep expecting an ivory tower dork-wad, but was surprised to find a super smart awesome guy. Present a series of challenges to Biblical accuracy or Strobrl theology “Can the Gospels really be relied upon as accurate? Listen to the response “Yes and here is why. Make slanted statements about any consensus amoung Biblical scholars, “the majority of reputable scholars are fairly comfortable with most of such and such.

Admit that the interview subject is right “Okay, okay, stop pummeling me with your unassailable arguments. No real attempt at counter argument is made. There is no hard hitting journalism. There is no real attempt at cross examination no pun intended. After about the third interview, I began to actually feel uncomfortable for him in that he was still trying to keep up this charade of confrontational skepticism.

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El Caso Del Creador by Lee Strobel (2 star ratings)

That being said, the book does have some positive aspects. It does provide a good overview of many of the criticisms of the Bible as well as an initial response to those criticisms. I know that you can’t present every answer and counter arguement to every issue in one book, but the way it is done just isn’t going to be very convincing to anyone. I think that such a weak effort can actually have the opposite of the intended effect and make people more skeptical.

As someone who is already a believer, I think we can do much much better than this in terms of defending the Bible and the faith. The author compares his investigation of the evidence for Christianity to his investigation of evidence for a legal case when he worked as a lawyer.

While I appreciate the point he is making, this constant method of comparison becomes a bit tedious; as a reader, I just want to get on with the apologetics.

His interview style is likewise wearying. While he’s telling me what professor this or that is doing with his pipe before answering his question, I just want to say, “Get to the point.

When reading his accounts of these interviews, I did not feel persuaded that Strobel was being convinced of the evidence for Christianity via his investigation, but that he was already convinced prior to the interviews, and that the interviews themselves are little more than a rhetorical device.

There’s nothing wrong with using rhetorical devices in apologetics, but then you shouldn’t pretend it’s something other than a device, and Strobel pretends it’s an empirical investigation born of doubt; I think this tactic is very much going to hurt his case with atheists and agnostics who will see it perhaps not wrongly as a ploy and then consequently discount the very real and otherwise persuasive evidence he does present. In short, I would have preferred a straightforward recounting of the evidence on behalf of Christianity.

There are many nuggets of persuasive value in this book, but you have to wade through a lot of extraneous material to get there. I wasn’t learning anything I haven’t already read before in other, more concise or more poetical apologetics, and so I ended up putting the book aside unfinished.

If I were to suggest an apologetic, it would not be this one. View all 7 comments. It would have been 3 stars but it’s super-condescending. It claims to offer a fair investigation, but it’s a one-sided affair. Which would have been fine, if that had been addressed honestly.

I think that if you pick up and read a book with a title like The Case for Christ, you probably have an open mind to Christianity, so it was all the more disappointing that this wasn’t well-done. I wish a super-intelligent and fair-minded Christian such as Marylynne Robinson would write a nonfiction book ab It would have been 3 stars but it’s super-condescending. I wish a super-intelligent and fair-minded Christian such as Marylynne Robinson would write a nonfiction book about Christianity.

She hasn’t has she? Dl anyone know of a book e, that creaddor recommend? The reason I did like it is because it presents an attempt at proving the events of the New Testament. Strobel at least makes a good argument that it’s not insane to believe that this happened. But despite his constant self-congratulating in the book, he doesn’t make a good argument that it’s highly logical based on the evidence.

The reasoning is very unclear in a number of places. He doesn’t acknowledge that weakness in some of the more important topics particularly weakens the entire structure of his argument. His house has an excellent roof on a very poor foundation. If anything, this book made me aware of some cogent-sounding counterarguments to Christianity of which I was not previously aware.

However, the more logical the counter-argument, the less time Strobel spends addressing it with any seriousness. For me, reading about physics has taken me further in believing in difficult-to-believe phenomena than this book has.

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Every once in a while there are true crime books written by the defense team of the accused, presenting the case for their client’s innocence, but which in fact only present a one-sided view that is easily refuted if one has the full range of evidence.

Such is the case with “The Case for Christ”. Lee Strobel, a former attorney and journalist, uses his “hard-nosed” journalism skills to approach the case for Jesus Christ as the Messiah. Now, I believe that Jesus is the Messiah, and I accept Strobel Every once in a while there are true crime books written by the defense team of the accused, presenting the case for their client’s innocence, but which in fact only present a one-sided view that is easily refuted if one has the full range of evidence.

However, I would never use “The Case for Christ” to try to prove any of this to someone who doesn’t accept it. As a work of apologetics, this book is very lacking. Strobel goes around the country, interviewing Mega-Church pastors, televangelists and theology professors at leading Evangelical seminaries, getting the “scoop” on Jesus. What Strobel is missing is the opinion of those who do not believe in Christ. He does interview one “Liberal” Protestant pastor who has rejected many of the Evangelical doctrines.

Strobel’s account of the interview is bizarre, complete with the liberal pastor breaking down in tears and whining about how he misses being in love with Jesus. Strobel does not interview leading atheists and scholars who reject Christ, asking why they reject Him.

El Caso Del Creador

Fel he did, and answered the objections, then this book would have some credibility. Strobel’s treatment of the pastors is similar to the mainstream media’s treatment of President Obama and his administration, plenty of softball questions and foregone conclusions. I don’t like it when the media treat Obama this way, and I don’t like it when a supposed apologist treats God as though He were a china doll who must not be exposed to negativity lest He break.

Leave Lee Strobel alone.

He is not worth reading. I expected this to be terrible. I read it because this is the book that Christians recommend to skeptical, questioning sorts along with the far more articulate Fl.

Lewisand I was curious about it. But I just knew I would hate it. I’ve never been much of a fan of religious “proofs. I hate to see someone trying to shoehorn faith into some kind of logical structure, especially one that is full of gaping holes and probl Here’s the thing: I hate kee see someone trying to shoehorn faith into some kind of logical structure, especially one that is full of gaping holes and problems. To me, this trivializes and undermines the essential mystery that makes faith so compelling and beautiful.

For this reason, I was actually surprised to find The Case for Christ to be something of a mixed bag, rather than a total loss, and I was glad I read it. Each chapter features an interview with a different Christian theologian, purportedly to address a different essential question of Christianity such as “Did Jesus really rise from the dead?

Lee Strobel’s prose offers little subtlety and lots of pat answers that beg more questions that he has no pat answers for.